Inspiring separating couples to make their own informed decisions

Posts tagged ‘Legal advice’

Unbundling of Family Law Services

As a result of the legal aid cut backs, family solicitors are now ‘unbundling’ their legal services to meet the demands of the emerging client base that cannot afford to instruct Solicitors on a traditional retainer basis. Please read the update on the Law Society Website here.

For those of you who are going through the traumatic time of a family break up or are contemplating separation/divorce from your partner, the above news will be of help to you if you are worried about securing legal services that is affordable.

Effectively, unbundling allows you to obtain legal services on a pay as you go basis on areas of your case that you feel it is absolutely necessary for you get  legal advice and /or representation without having to instruct your solicitor to have full conduct of your matter on a formal full retainer basis.

There will have to be a clear understanding about what steps your solicitor is instructed to undertake on your behalf e.g. providing initial advice on law and procedure, ad hoc advice to help you represent yourself in Court proceedings or checking and drafting documents.  The case will  be ‘client-led’ as opposed to ‘solicitor-led’. This allows you to stay in control of your case and limits your legal costs moving forwards. So, your solicitor will offer legal services on what is known as a ‘partial retainer’. If you would like to find out more information about how this works in practice please see the Practice Note issued by the Law Society for Solicitors here.

This kind of service will only be suitable for those of you feel confident and competent to take control and charge of your case with bespoke services and support from your Solicitor.

If you are contemplating separation or divorce from your partner or you have already separated, I would suggest that you consider in the first instance, the services of a family mediator to reach your own informed decisions about property, finance and/or children.

Family mediation will prove to be a less  stressful  and a more dignified option to resolving your differences. It will limit both the financial and emotional costs of your break up. For more information visit the Family Mediation pages on my website.

Government’s New Sorting Out Separation App

Having to go through separation/divorce can be classed as one of the most stressful experiences in your lifetime.

Some would say that it is far more difficult to cope with than the bereavement of a close family member or friend – it is a ‘living bereavement’.

Whilst there are grave concerns about the impact of the cuts to family legal aid that come into force in April 2013, thankfully there is help at hand for those of you who will not qualify for family legal aid as a result of the cutbacks and cannot afford the services of a solicitor.

The Government has launched an online application/website  for separating couples to give you much needed help, support and guidance. It covers the following topics with useful contact information, tools, videos and links to help you make informed decisions after a break-up:

  • Children &  Parenting
  • Health
  • Housing
  • Legal
  • Money & Finance
  • Relationships & Conflicts
  • Work & Benefits

By answering a series of questions, the web app will give you a personalised action plan. Click here to check out the new sorting out separation web app.

However, where  you are unsure about your respective rights and responsibilities or where there are complex issues arising out of your separation, a word of caution, it is always sensible to get specialist legal advice. Many solicitors offer an initial fixed fee service, which can prove to be invaluable.

To help you and your ex-partner have a dignified and amicable separation allowing for future co-operative parenting, family mediation, when suitable, can be a better way of reaching out of court agreements.

Related articles

 

Top Tips For A Hassle Free Divorce!

  1. Do as much of your own research on the law that affects your rights and responsibilities upon separation/divorce – with the World Wide Web at most people’s fingers tips – this should be relatively easy!
  2. Where access to the internet is limited or not available – you can get a lot free information from Law Centres, Citizens’ Advice Centres, or from other similar not for profit organisations in your locality, make sure you are clued up!!
  3. Typically, for married couples/civil partners, you will need to know  how to dissolve your marriage/civil partnership and the main factors that the Court will take into account when considering the terms of a financial settlement under the Matrimonial Causes Act 1973.
  4. For unmarried couples the law is more complex and will be governed by trust law principles and  the Trusts of Land and Appointment of Trustee Act.
  5. When looking at children’s arrangements you will need to be familiar with Children Act 1989  and the factors that the Court will take into account when considering what arrangements will be in the best interests of your child. You can find useful guides on the cafcass website here.
  6. Know that all solicitors/legal advisors work from the same hymn sheet and are governed by same law, and so in the usual run of cases where there are simply not enough capital and/or income resources to sustain the same level of living standards that you had when you were a couple, there will be little scope for creative legal arguments as ‘needs will trump all’  in every such case.
  7. Take stock of your personal circumstances – create your own schedule of assets/liabilities/incomes/budgets to compare your  financial positions and make sure this is undertaken on an open and transparent basis with both of you having had the benefit of either considering supporting documents so that there is no doubt about the information on the schedule or you may waive the right to exchange financial information if you both have had full first-hand knowledge/access to the information and there is no doubt or concern about the same.
  8. Make sure you look after your health and emotional /psychological well-being. Going through a separation/Divorce will probably be one of your most difficult life challenges. Some separating couples have described it as ‘a living bereavement’ and have stated that it was harder to cope with than an actual bereavement of a close family member/friend. Take all the help and support that you can. Not only from family members and friends but most importantly, from other professionals who are qualified and trained to help you at this time of emotional crisis. For example, your GP maybe able to prescribe short-term medication to help with any feelings of low-esteem and he/she may refer you to a specialist Counsellor/Therapist to give you more support. Visit Relate website for more information.

Visit the legal Information Hub on my website to get started and please give serious consideration to family mediation in the even that you cannot reach your own direct agreements. This will serve you, your ex-partner and most importantly, your children well. It is the least self-destructive way of resolving family disputes and reaching resolutions, allowing you the freedom to move on to a brighter, happier and stress free future.

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